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Machine gun pill box

Machine gun pill box

P1040124

Photograph of the pill box from a moving train.

Hexagonal concrete-faced 'type 22 pillbox, buried half way up to roof.

P1060090

Details

Ownership

Network Rail

Date or period

Circa. 1940

Current Designation

None

Group Value

None.

Condition

Poor.

In June 1940, under the direction of General Edmund Ironside, concentric rings of anti-tank defences and pillboxes were constructed in and around London. They comprised: The London Inner Keep, London Stop Line Inner (Line C), London Stop Line Central (Line B) and London Stop Line Outer (Line A).[1] The Outer London Ring was the strongest and best developed of these, mainly because it could be constructed in open countryside. Work on all the lines was halted weeks later by Ironside's successor, General Alan Brooke,[2] who favoured mobile warfare above static defence.

The primary purpose of the stop lines and the anti-tank islands that followed was to hold up the enemy, slowing progress and restricting the route of an attack. The need to prevent tanks from breaking through was of key importance. Consequently, the defences generally ran along pre-existing barriers to tanks such as rivers and canals; railway embankments and cuttings; thick woods; and other natural obstacles.

Future Conservation

Condition survey needed.


References

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outer_London_Defence_Ring

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fortifications_of_London








References

http://bombsight.org

[UORN 782].

[UORN 12579].

leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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