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Lea Bridge Green

Details

Ownership

LB of Hackney.

Date or period

Mapping evidence indicates the formation of the boundaries of the green by about 1820, the History of the County of Middlesex map shows an earlier triangular plot relating to the Lammas Lands and the Tyssen Manor.

Current Designation

Lea Bridge Conservation Area. Archaeological Priority Area. It is not known if there are rights of access onto what appears to be common land, although the land may be an ‘urban common’ and may be crossed by public rights of way.

Group Value

Group value with the former schoolhouse, the Ship Aground, the Princess of Wales and the former Carbonic works and Millfields.

Condition

The grass is uneven and various works and possibly heavy vehicles appear to have caused ruts in the ground.

Lea Bridge Place green

Mapping evidence indicates the formation of the boundaries of the green by about 1820, the History of the County of Middlesex map shows an earlier triangular plot relating to the Lammas Lands and the Tyssen Manor.

The diagonal form of the green may be of significance. The map of manorial interests in Hackney (VCH) shows a diagonal plot in a similar place. There is also a speculative correlation with the alignment of the Walthamstow slip from across the Lea. The Lea Bridge Turnpike resisted the formation of accesses directly off the Turnpike.

Landscape Merit

The green has the same character as many of the ‘Hackney Commons’, with areas of open grass lined by mature London plane trees. The green forms a central part of a coherent urban composition reinforced by the isolated hamlet character created by the surrounding Millfields open spaces. The green, which is distinct from the surrounding Millfields, is typical of a triangular roadside village green. Historic maps indicate what may have been a horse trough or memorial in the centre and later a urinal.

Historical Association

This green is not named in the London Squares Act and we do not know if it is a protected village green, but it clearly exhibits many of the qualities associated with such designations: such as Clapton Common nearby. Common land and rights are a very ancient institution - even older than Parliament itself with their origins in the manorial system.

Archaeological Significance

The diagonal form of the green may be of significance. The map of manorial interests in Hackney (VCH) shows a diagonal plot in a similar place. There is also a speculative correlation with the alignment of the Walthamstow slip from across the Lea. The Lea Bridge Turnpike resisted the formation of accesses directly off the Turnpike.

Future Conservation

The status should be confirmed with Hackney; though a ‘Commons Registration Authority’ managing the Statutory register of common lands & village greens. The green is not addressed directly in the Millfields masterplan (possibly LB of Hackney Highways ownership?). A basic improvement scheme is, at least, needed. The Hackney core strategy map is ambiguous and fuzzy regarding the status and importance of the green.

leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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