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Lea Bridge Weir

LB1 21

Lea Bridge Weir from the north c.1872. ( Hackney Archives)

P1040594

Surviving cast iron sluice gates

Lea Bridge Weir

The weir is sometimes now referred to as Middlesex Filter beds Weir, but this seems to be a later association.A weir at this point was also referred to as the "Upper Ford'.

P1030621

Lea Bridge Weir

Details

Ownership

Thames Water/ Canals and Waterways Trust

Date or period

1381

Current Designation

None

Archaeological Significance

Text

Group Value

Text

Condition

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The weir in this location was probably first erected to provide water to power to a cornmill from about 1707. However, earlier structures had been erected in the area, including an early form of lock called a 'flashlock'.

A mill, from which North Mill field in 1381 and South Mill field in 1443 were named, was presumably the forerunner of corn mills atLea Bridge.[5].

The weir also seems to be indivisble from records of wooden bridges crossings between islands and linking Hackney with Leyton including 'Lockbridge' - from 1485, possibly the first Lea Bridge that may have also been a type of lock or weir known as a flash lock.



P1050338
leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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