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1600-1699

17C

‘At the corner of North Mill Field, facing the River Lea, is the Jolly Anglers public house, which appears from its internal vestiges to be upwards of 300 years old. It seems originally to have been built of brick, and must have been very small. The primitive building consisted of the bar, kitchen, cellar, and small bed-chamber over the bar, while the other parts have been subsequently added by different tenants.’[1] The construction of the Jolly Anglers may possibly be associated with the collapse of a bridge between 1612 and 1630 and the instatement of ferries (and fords). This may be the location of 'Smith's Ferry', crossing over to Essex Wharf.

1609

In 1609, an Act was passed for bringing a fresh stream of water by engine from Hackney Marsh to the City of London for the benefit of the King's College at Chelsey (Chelsea) between Lock Bridge near Hackney and Bow Bridge at Stratford.[2]

1611-30

The Lockbridge of 1486–7 had broken down in 1551, but by 1594 was ‘one of the most useful bridges in Middlesex’. When the bridges were again dangerously decayed in 1611–13 the county disclaimed responsibility for them. The bridge collapsed finally between 1612 and 1630, and was replaced by a ferry, later known as Hackney or Jeremy's Ferry (and possibly also Smith’s Ferry, slightly to the north). The ford was still called Lockbridge in 1646.[3]

When the causeway from the east was again dangerously decayed in 1611-13, no one undertook repairs and the county also disclaimed responsibility for them. By 1694 only ruins remained and which were still visible in the nineteenth century. The collapse led to the decline of the road along the current Lea Bridge Road from the east whilst Water Lane (from Walthamstow) and Marsh Lane (across Leyton Marsh) continued to be recorded on maps.

1612

It was stated that market people travelled across the Leyton marshes four days a week to London via Lockbridge and Hackney.[4]

1616-33

Both Margaret Audley (in 1616) and David Doulben (in 1633) left money in their wills for the upkeep of what is now known as the Market Porters Route or the Black Path between Clapton and the City of London.[5]

1637

A circulating preacher called Davenport, possibly the puritan John Davenport (d. 1670), was reported in 1637 at Hackney,[6] where in 1641 a crowd gathered for rebaptism in theLea.[7]

1646

Mapping evidence shows that the ford was still called ‘Lockbridge’.

1665-66

Following the Great Plague of London in 1665 (that had not affected Hackney) and the Great Fire the year after, Hackney became increasingly attractive to the wealthy. Wealthy residents built large houses in Hackney to enjoy country living whilst also close to the court, entertainment and the financial centre of the kingdom.

1694

By 1694, only the ruins of the causeway from the east remained, but these were still visible in the 19th Century.[8]

File:Izaak Walton.jpg

Izaak Walton, author of 'The Compleat Angler'

1695

Commission of Sewers established but this commission no longer supervised the New River, and along the Lea supervised only that part of the navigable river between Ware and the 'beginning of the new Cutt neare Hackney' with the specific injunction that they had no authority over any part of the river over which the City of London was claiming jurisdiction 'by any Custome or Speciall Priviledge'.[9]

c.1695

Official recognition was to be given to the mistaken claim that the City had built a new cut along the lower Lea under the 1571 Act.[10]

1699

Walthamstow Slip is shown on maps of 1699 and later[11], cutting across fields straight from mark to mark, usually regardless of natural boundaries from the Eagle Pond to the River Lea, just below the Horse and Groom. The Slip varied in width from about 50 to 100 yards and divided Layton into two parts with the three mile corridor belonging to Walthamstow parish, part of Walthamstow Tony manor[12]. Its origin is uncertain, though various traditions exist.[13]


References

[1] The Municipal Parks, Gardens, And Open Spaces Of London. Lieut.-Col. J. J. Sexby, V. Delliot Stock. 1905. Quoting John Thomas, MS. ' History of Hackney,' chap, iii., section 4, p. 42.

[2] The Navigation Of The River Lee (1190 – 1790). Occasional Paper New Series No. 36. J.G.L.Burnby and M.Parker. Edmonton Hundred Historical Society. 1978

[3] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R.Powell (Editor). 1973

[4] The Road to Jeremy’s Ferry. Oral history of “Leyton Gateway” Lea Bridge Road. Norma Crooks. 2003

[5] Tudor Hackney. National Archives.

[6] A History of the County of Middlesex Volume 10: Hackney: Protestant Nonconformity, pp. 130-144, Fn 65. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[7] A History of the County of Middlesex Volume 10: Hackney: Protestant Nonconformity, pp. 130-144, Fn 66. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[8] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[9] The River Lea: An Adequate Seventeenth Century Flash-Lock Navigation

[10] The River Lea: An Adequate Seventeenth Century Flash-Lock Navigation

[11] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn. 10. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[12] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn. 8 and 11. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[13] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn. 9 and 12. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973


Recollections, comments, contributions and corrections

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leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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