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1851-1860

1850

The Hackney Vestry unanimously resolved to seek the establishment of a public body to improve the metropolitan water supply.[1]

1850

Before the works were designed in 1852, the company had been taking theirwater frombelow Lea Bridge Mills. Under the Actof1850, the East London Water Company acquired power to take theirwaterimmediately above Lea Bridge Mills, but nothing further had beendesignedor proposed until the scheme for the Actof1852.[2]

1850s

The Ferry House Inn, mentioned in 1702 and described as ancient in 1757, probably dated from the collapse of Lockbridge in the earlier 17th Century. Later known as the Horse and Groom, it was demolished in the 1850s when the Waterworks filter beds were built.[3]

Ashpitel's Dock (Hackney Achives)

1850s

From the mid 1850s to 1970, V. Radley and Sons (a family boat building company) operated on the River Lea in N.E. London in the Clapton area. They built wooden boats for both racing and for leisure. The first known picture of their premises is shown above probably taken in the late 19th or early 20th century. At its peak in the 20th Century, there were three sites, the last of which was atSpringhill, opposite what is now Lea Rowing Club. The businesswas started by George Radley and was then run by succeeding generations of Radley: Vincent, Wallis and, finally, Sid assisted by his brother Wally.

1850-56

The Lea Bridge Half Lock (south of the weir) is removed.

1850-58

Foundation of the partnership of Arthur Ashpitel (architect of St Barnabus Church, Homerton) and John Whichcord Jr. The partnership was possibly dissolved in 1855 after Ashpitel’s health was further damaged by a Malaria attack. Ashpitel continued to accept commissions[4].

1851

Thomas Wicksteed resigns his post as Engineer to the East London Waterworks.

P1020276

W.H. Ashpitel's grave in St John's Churchyard, Clapton

1852

William Hurst Ashpitel dies 20 April 1852 having left his profession early in life. Property is left to his two sons.

Parliament asserted general control over the London water companies. The East London Water Compamy was empowered to remove its intake at Lea Bridge as far as Tottenham (but only on the understanding that in the next session of Parliament it would introduce a Bill for the purpose of moving its intake much higher, to Fielde's Weir). This provision of the Bill was, however, turned down by Parliament in 1853, so the intake, which had remained at Lea Bridge, was removed to the Copper Mills at Walthamstow.

1853

Date given on side of Dock Bridge which bears the legend ‘H&M.D.GRISSEL LONDON 1853’. Grissells also made an early post office letter box at the same time in their Regents Canal Iron Works (located in Eagle Wharf Road, Hackney, N1) as well asLondon Coal Tax Posts.

New filter beds built at Lea Bridge by the East London Waterworks Company under an Act of 1853, one on the Essex side of the Lea (No. 1 Essex Filter Beds) and the other replacing Lea bridge reservoir (Middlesex Filter Beds)[5] and Essex.[6]

1853

The Company introduced a Bill into Parliament for the purposeoftaking yourwater fromField's Weir at the junction between the Stort and the Lea but were opposed by the Government on accountoftheir factories at Waltham and Enfield, and preventedfromtaking your supply higher up than their works.[7]

1853

The East London Water Company had no steam power at Lea Bridge, only water power, at the time the Act was passed in 1853.[8]

1853-4 Second Cholera Epidemic reported by Snow including the Broad Street Pump cholera outbreak of 1854 in Soho.

1854

Detail of the Victoria Pumping Engine 1854

A new engine was installed at the waterworks[9]. The new Cornish engine of the East London Waterworks Company was one of the largest ever constructed for London. One of the cylinders was 100 inches in diameter and had an 11 foot stroke.

The East London Waterworks Company had completed a new bridge to carry the Lea Bridge Road over the new aqueduct authorised under the Act of 1852-3 (the current cycle way underpass).

1855

Under the Metropolis Management Act 1855, Stoke Newington had been grouped with the neighbouring parish of Hackney under the administration of the Hackney District Board of Works. A distinct civil parish dates from 1855, with the incorporation of The Vestry of the Parish of Hackney in the County of Middlesex by section 42 of the Metropolis Management Act. With Stoke Newington it formed part of the Hackney District, governed by the Hackney District Board of Works, within the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works. In 1894, the district and board were dissolved, with the Hackney vestry taking on its duties within the parish.

The road commissioners allowed the Waterworks Company to fill in the ditch between the road and their works (south east of Lea Bridge) and sold to them the toll house garden for the entrance to the works by the bridge.

John Snow wrote ‘It is probable also, that the water of theEast London Company, obtained above Lea Bridge, had no share in propagating the malady (Cholera)’.[10] ‘The water of theEast London Companyis also free from the contents of sewers, unless it be those from the neighbourhood of Upper Clapton, where there has been very little cholera’ [11]

The East London and the New River Companies were by statute given virtually equal shares in all the water of the Lea beyond 54 million gallons a day needed for the navigation.[12]

1855-62

The Victoria Pumping Engine

'Harvey and Co. of Hayle, Cornwall display a model and publish an engraving of a single-acting condensing pumping engine and of a safety-balance valve, ‘on the Cornish principle’, for East London Waterworks Company, at Lea Bridge. At the time of its erection in 1855, this was the largest machine for supplying water to towns ever constructed.[13] ‘This engine, when working full power, pumps about 9,060 gallons of water per minute, usually 140 ft. high, which water is conveyed into London by cast-iron pipes 36 in. diameter’.

In 1872, the Board was warned that compulsory attendance could be achieved only after a building programme in the poorest districts, where absentees were 'of such a low order' as to be unfit to mix with children in regular attendance. [14]

1855

TheAuroraCricket Club played at Pond Lane, adjoining South Mill field, before the formation in 1855 of its successor Homerton and Clapton club.[15]

1856

Clapton toll gate abolished and in its place at the entrance to Lea Bridge Road the Hackney Board of Works erected an obelisk with lamp.

Arthur Ashpitel gives evidence to a House of Commons Committee regarding the Metropolis Turnpike Roads. He refers to his considerable property in the Lee Bridge-road ‘a large dock and wharf property’ which he states were constructed ‘some thirty years ago’ (1826). Ashpitel’s tenants needed to pay tolls at Clapton and also Lea Bridge tolls, although they do not go over the bridge. Ashpitel claimed that tolls acted as a prohibition to building wharves in the neighbourhood and half of his property and land remained unlet. The tolls were 6d.a ton?—It is3d.at each gate for a single horse-load, which is about a ton ; so that that makes 6d.a ton for the two gates. The charge for wharfing was from 9d.a ton.

1858

In 1858, Leyton challenged Walthamstow's attempt to establish the course of the Walthamstow Slip through the most valuable part of the Waterworks Company's filter beds.[16]


References

[1] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Public services, pp. 108-115, Fn 86. T.F.T.Baker (Editor) 1995

[2] Evidence of Charles Greaves, on the East London Water Bills etc. to Parliament 21 May 1867

[3] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn 106. W.R.Powell (Editor). 1973

[4] Transactions of the Institute of Surveyors, Volume 1, p.345. 1869

[5] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Public services, pp. 108-115, Fn 85. T.F.T.Baker (Editor) 1995

[6] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 5: Local Administration and Public Services: Utility Services, pp. 37-47, Fn 4. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1966

[7] Evidence of Charles Greaves, on the East London Water Bills etc. to Parliament 21 May 1867

[8] Evidence of Charles Greaves, on the Eats London Water Bills etc. to Parliament 21 May 1867

[9] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Public services, pp. 108-115, Fn 85. T.F.T.Baker (Editor) 1995

[10] Communication of Cholera, pp. 64-5. John Snow. 1855

[11] Communication of Cholera, p. 9. John Snow.1855

[12] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 5: Local Administration and Public Services: Utility Services, pp. 37-47, Fn 5. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1966

[13] 1862 London Exhibition: Catalogue: Class VIII. Harvey and Co

[14] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Education

[15] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Social and Cultural Activities, pp. 65-73. 1995

[16] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn 14. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973


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leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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