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1871-1890

1870-71

In 1871, on cessation of the Turnpike Trusts, the Essex half of the bridge was adopted by the county and becomes a ‘CountyBridge’.[1]

1871

The G.P.O. erected telegraph posts by the side of the road from Clapton to Walthamstow.[2]

1871

Plaque held had the Kew Bridge Steam Museum. Water was pumped across London from the Thames to the Lea. Fies Nobilium Tu Quoque Fontium is quoted for Horace, Odes (Hor.3 Carm xiii. 13) You also shall become one of the world's great fountains.[3]

P1060604

The plaque at Kew Steam Museum

1872

The Essex section ofLeaBridgeRoad retained its own trustees. Their tollhouse in Hackney (probably on the west side of Lea Bridge) also remained in use until 1872.

Act of Parliament confirmed transfer of Hackney commons (including north and south Millfields) to the Metropolitan Board of Works.

Growth was stimulated by the opening of Clapton railway station in 1872, followed closely by the arrival of tramways at Lower Clapton and their extension in 1875 to Clapton common.[4] The spread of building, however, was limited by public control of the Mill fields from 1872.

The commissioners went out of existence on 1st July 1872, when section 13 of the Annual Turnpike Acts Continuance Act 1871 (C.115) came into effect. The roads under the care of the trust passed to the various parish vestries on that date.[5]

1873-8

In 1873, the newly constituted Leyton urban sanitary district included the Walthamstow Slip, which was also amalgamated with Leyton civil parish in 1878.[6]

1875

Protests provoked by inclosing part of Hackney Downs and the Mill fields. Fences were torn down, as were notices put up by the Grocers' Co. in 1877, but Chancery upheld him against the Metropolitan Board of Works in 1879.[7] His rights were purchased by the M.B.W. under an Act of 1881 and those of other freeholders under a further Act of 1884.[8]

1875-94

Hackney cricket club played mainly at Clapton in 1875,[9] presumably on the ground by South Mill field which after 1894 was covered by the east end of Mildenhall Road. In 1869, most matches took place in Victoria Park or on Hackney Downs, where Cricketfield Road was so called from 1864, or at Pond Lane (Millfields Road).[10]

1885

Opening of the Johnstone Boathouse, home to the Eton Mission Rowing Club.

1887 Pond Lane renamed as Millfields Road.[11]

1877 It was reported that; ‘the lands lining the river bank are for many miles on both sides quite submerged and many of the cottages and fishing houses are from two to four feet deep in water. In some circumstances the inhabitants are living in the upper storeys: The necessities of life being conveyed to them by boat’.

1880s Beyond the fringe of all this speculative development a bungalow town of 69 shacks, with wells and earth closets, and a wooden mission church, sprang up in the 1880s at Lea Bridge Gardens, west of Lea Bridge station.[12] The occupants reared ducks and grew vegetables. These buildings were demolished in the 1930s and the site is now mainly industrial.[13]

1880 In the 19th Century, the Lea was popular for boating, fishing, and bathing; several rowing clubs existed by 1880.[14]

Sir Leonard Woolley, archaeologist and excavator of the ancient city of Ur, was born at 13 Southwold Road (now demolished). The Ur of Chaldees, found in present-day Iraq, was the royal burial site of many Mesopotamian royalties.[15]

1881 The LeaBridge, Leyton and Walthamstow Tramways Company was incorporated.[16]

Members of the Glyn Cricket Club formed a football team for the purpose of keeping fit in the winter months. This was later to become Glyn Cricket Club, then Orient, then Clapton Orient and finally Leyton Orient Football Club.

1883 LeaBridge, Leyton and Walthamstow Tramways Co opened a single-line horse tram service along Lea Bridge Road in 1883 but encountered severe financial difficulties These caused it to undergo winding up and subsequent reconstruction, and it was unable to complete its works until the early 1890s.[17]

Liquidation proceedings against Thomas Riddell of Lea Bridge Glass Works, Lea Bridge: ‘In the Matter of Proceedings for Liquidation by Arrangement or Composition with Creditors, instituted by Thomas Riddell, ofLea BridgeGlass Works,Lea Bridge, Clapton, and of 4 Powell Road, Lower Clapton’.[18]

1884 St Barnabas Hall and schools, Homerton high street built of Kentish ragstone and in Tudor style.

1885 Hoard of spearheads recovered during the digging of a well at the pumping station (held at the Vestry House Museum, Walthamstow).

Date given on keystone of Octagonal Sluice building at Lea Bridge Weir.

1888 The Lea Bridge Road passed out of local control when it became a county road under the Local Government Act of 1888.

1889-92Tramway opened in stages from Leyton extending across the Lea Bridge to Clapton.

Late19C. Southwold Junior Mixed and Infants' School, Mount Pleasant Hill, E5 constructed. This late 19th Century board school is listed Grade II.[19]

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The late 19th Century board school, Clapton Park Lower School, opens in Oswald Street E5. Listed Grade II.[20]


References

[1] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R.Powell (Editor). 1973

[2] Lea Bridge Turnpike and the Wragg Stage Coaches. W. G. S. Tonkin, Walthamstow Antiq. Soc. 1974

[3] http://thing-a-day2010.posterous.com/?tag=thingaday&page=11

[4] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Clapton, pp. 44-51, Fn 65. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[5] Metropolitan Turnpike Trust (Wikipedia)

[6] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R.Powell (Editor). 1973

[7] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Public services, pp. 108-115, Fn 61. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[8] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Public services, pp. 108-115, Fn 62. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[9] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Social and Cultural Activities, pp. 65-73, Fn. 93. 1995

[10] A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 10: Hackney: Social and Cultural Activities, pp. 65-73. 1995

[11]A History of the County of Middlesex Volume 10: Hackney: Communications, pp. 4-10, Fn 41. T.F.T. Baker (Editor). 1995

[12] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184, Fn 137. W. R.Powell (Editor). 1973

[13] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[14] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6, Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[15] www.hackney.gov.uk/ep-leonard-woolley.htm

[16] Burdett's Official Intelligence for 1885, 878–9, 882–3 in History of the County of Essex

[17] A History of the County of Essex: Volume 6: Leyton: Introduction, pp. 174-184. W.R. Powell (Editor). 1973

[18] The Accountant Volume 8. 1883

[19] English Heritage List Reference Number: 1265190

[20] English Heritage List entry Number: 1265147


Recollections, comments, contributions and corrections

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leabridge.org.uk December 2012
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